Handling Estate Planning And Probate For You And Your Family

At Westmoreland, Patterson, Moseley & Hinson, L.L.P., we assist clients with the probate process. "Probate" includes petitioning the court to probate (to prove the validity of) the last will and testament, administration of estates, petitions for year's support, objection to wills, and other post-death issues. We also handle guardianships of minors and incapacitated adults.

In addition, we deal with a variety of issues regarding estate planning. Estate planning is one of the things most people know they should do, and actually plan on doing someday, but for one reason or another gets put off, sometimes until it is too late. In those cases, your estate is probated according to state laws (we also handle probate litigation), which often are not nearly as favorable as proper estate planning. Why let the government obtain part of your estate that could have been passed to your family or other designated recipient

Our Lawyers Can Guide You Forward

At Westmoreland, Patterson, Moseley & Hinson, L.L.P., we have been assisting Georgia residents with their estate planning needs (including guardianships, conservatorships, living wills and powers of attorneys) for over 50 years. Our attorneys understand how to properly draft wills and trusts to allow you to maximize your control over how your estate will be handled upon your death.

You and your family can take comfort that proper planning has maximized the estate you pass down, and that it is being distributed according to your wishes. If you have not started your estate planning, or if your estate has significantly changed since your last estate planning, then you should contact an experienced Georgia estate planning attorney to assist you with proper estate planning.

Do You Need A Will, Trust Or Power Of Attorney?

Our experienced lawyers can help you create a will, trust, general or limited power of attorney, or a durable power of attorney for health care. A durable power of attorney for health care allows you to select someone (of more than one) to make health care decisions for you in the event you are unable to do so. Most Georgia residents are familiar with Terri Schiavo, a Florida resident who became mentally incapacitated and sparked a 15-year legal battle over whether or not to sustain her life using artificial means. Years of bitter litigation can be averted by having a living will, expressing your wishes or a durable power of attorney for health care that appoints someone to make that decision.

Get Sound Legal Counsel

Don't end up putting your loved ones in an entangled legal battle; contact an experienced Georgia estate planning attorney today to arrange for your will, trust, general power of attorney and durable power of attorney for health care.